Author Archives: Dawn

Snapshots Quilt-Along: Block 2

snapshots-banner
Like so many in the quilting community, I am enchanted by the Snapshots quilt you see above, designed by the mother-daughter team of Bonnie Olaveson and Camille Roskelley. Each woman is a talented quilt designer in her own right; as Bonnie and Camille, they design fabric for Moda. They collaborated to design this sampler quilt celebrating moments of happiness in our lives. The quilt is the centerpiece of a year-long Quilt-Along organized by the Fat Quarter Shop and Moda Fabrics for the benefit of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

I willingly donated to this worthy cause and am downloading instructions as they are released on the 15th of each month, even though at this point I don’t plan to make the entire quilt. I do plan to make at least two blocks.

Many happy moments in my life have been spent in front of my sewing machine, so I knew as soon as I saw Snapshots that I would make February’s block, named “Sew On and Sew On” by the designers. Here is my version:

Snapshots block 2-15

How do you like the “knobs” on my sewing machine? My color scheme was dictated by the piece of fabric in my stash that strip came from.

Bonnie and Camille’s block measures 12½” x 16½”. Since I’m not incorporating my block into a quilt, I added strips to the top and bottom and widened the side strips. My block measures 15″ x 17½”. I’m thinking about framing it and hanging it in my sewing room.

As the end of this month is mere hours away (how quickly it flew by!), I’m claiming this as my final February finish.

 

 

 

Posted in Quilt-Along, update | 5 Comments

Reach for the Stars: Side by Side

My quilt Catch a Falling Star, based on Minnesota quiltmaker Terri Krysan’s Reach for the Stars quilt, is currently hanging in the Pine Needle Quilt Shop where it is receiving very nice comments from customers.

Several people have asked how my quilt differs from Terri Krysan’s (other than the obvious difference of fabric choices) so I thought I would give you a look at both quilts side by side:

Reach for the Stars3
Left, Terri Krysan’s original quilt “Reach for the Stars” (86¾” x 106½”), 2012. Right, Dawn’s version, “Catch a Falling Star” (84″ x 105″), 2015.

(Photo on left copyright Quilter’s Newsletter. Used with permission. Photo by Melissa Karlin Mahoney. Photo on right by Bill Volckening.)

The center medallion and three of the blocks were made following Terri’s design. From there I departed in ways both large and small. I’ll use the quilt outline below to explain those differences:medallion quilt layout

Blocks 1 and 2: no changes.

Block 3: incorporated fussy-cut images in outer part of block.

Block 4: changed center of block to a fussy-cut image enclosed in an inset circle. Moved to Block 11 position.

Block 5: no change.

Block 6: replaced pinwheel in center of block with a 4-Patch Wonder block. Moved to Block 7 position.

Block 7: eliminated appliquéd circles, incorporated fussy-cut image in center of block. Moved to Block 14 position.

Block 8: incorporated fussy-cut image in center of block and changed design of outer part to incorporate fussy-cut border stripe. Moved to Block 6 position.

Block 9: added four triangles to create a star. Moved to Block 13 position.

Block 10: replaced block completely with design spotted on a coffee mug.

Block 11: replaced block completely with a block I dreamed up (although it may well exist elsewhere). Moved to Block 4 position.

Block 12: made the center a square within a square and changed the color value in the corner four-patches to avoid having dark fabric in the points where they would bleed into the black sashing. Moved to Block 9 position.

Block 13: incorporated fussy-cut image into circle in center. My circle is inset rather than appliquéd. Moved to Block 8 position.

Block 14: replaced center of block with a double pinwheel block incorporating fussy-cut images. Moved to Block 12 position.

That’s it for the blocks, though I should note that Terri used fussy-cut images in seven of her 14 blocks. I challenged myself to incorporate fussy-cut images in all 14.

The setting triangles were made following Terri’s design but I altered the design of the checked border to make all four corners symmetrical. I’m very proud of that achievement.

Now you probably think all 14 blocks are different, don’t you? Not so! Two of the blocks are exactly the same design. They just look different because of the fabrics used. Can you spot which two are the same? Here’s a bigger photo of my quilt to help you look:

CAFS front BV photo 800Happy hunting!

 

 

 

Posted in 4-Patch Wonder, Reach for the Stars sampler quilt, update | 5 Comments

Another February Finish: Olivia Twist

My first (but not my last) bedrunner quilt is back from the longarmer. It’s also bound, labeled, and ready to display. So satisfying to report another February finish! Here it is:

Olivia Twist front (2)

Olivia Twist, so named because of the floral focus fabric (A Garden for Olivia by In the Beginning Fabrics) and the twist block, measures 31″ x 76″ — a good size for the bottom of a double or queen-size bed. The design is adapted from my pattern 4-Patch Wonder with a Twist.

I’m delighted with the free-motion quilting done by Jolene Knight of Good Knight Quilts. I’ll bet you’d like to see some details, wouldn’t you? Happy to oblige.

In the 4-Patch Wonder blocks Jolene quilted a radiating blossom, repeating the same motif in the small black squares between blocks:

Olivia Twist quilting detail front 2
You can also see the whimsical leaf-and-loop motif she quilted in the lattice strips. Here’s another block:

Olivia Twist, quilting detail on front
In the background Jolene quilted a free-form spiral motif with pebbles here and there. Check this out:

Olivia Twist, quilting detail background

(The background fabric looks almost purple in the photo above. In actuality it is a very dark navy and black batik print.)

On the back of the quilt is a full length piece of the focus fabric as well as three leftover 4-Patch Wonder blocks set on point:

Olivia Twist back

In this close-up of the back, you can see more of Jolene’s playful free-motion quilting:

Olivia Twist, quilting detail on back
I’m already thinking about my next bedrunner quilt. My choice of pattern may surprise you. I hope you’ll check back in a few days to see what I have in mind.

 

 

 

Posted in 4-Patch Wonder, bed runners, faux-kaleido quilts, free motion quilting, update | 4 Comments

Diane’s Table Runner in Situ

A couple weeks ago I wrote about a reversible table runner I made for my sister Diane’s living room. The runner was made to cover a seam (for lack of a better word) created when two chests were placed back to back to create a larger table surface between two chairs. Here’s a look at the single chest Diane started with:

dks liv rm before photo
Even with the lamp placed at the very back of the chest, people sitting in the chairs had to crane their necks around the lamp to see each other when talking. The limited surface space made it difficult to have multiple items on the chest at the same, items such as a TV remote, a glass of wine, a cell phone, a book. In addition, the drawers in the chest were difficult to open from a sitting position because the chest was positioned so far back. You can understand why Diane considered this a design dilemma.

Her solution was to take a matching chest from another room and place it back to back with the first one, doubling the surface area, making it possible to move the lamp farther back toward the windows, and making the drawers in front more accessible. Sounded like a win-win-win to me. The only issue was the seam where the two chests met.

That’s where the table runner (and I) came in. Consulting by phone between Portland and Atlanta, Diane and I selected fabric from my stash and I proceeded to make this reversible runner that measures about 9½” x 41″:

runner completed

It was very easy to make: two cotton prints, a layer of batting, simple cross-hatching for the quilting, and traditional double-fold binding. Soon it was on its way across the country. Here it is in place:

dks liv rm after toile

See how much farther back the lamp is? Much easier now for folks to converse. The toile fabric is in the up position in the picture above. Here’s another shot with the floral vine in the up position:

after with vine 2

While auditioning fabrics, Diane and I kept the sofa pillows in mind:

dks liv rm couch (2)

Look how well these fabrics go together. I especially like the connection between the floral vine fabric on the runner and the pillow on the left:

table runner and pillows
This home dec mini makeover came with a bonus: because the chests are positioned back to back, there’s a set of drawers on both sides. Diane and Ed’s 5½-year-old grandson Edward gets the exclusive use of the drawers at the back for his own little stash of treasures and playthings:

in place 3

 

 

 

Posted in family, home dec, update | 4 Comments

Friday Finishes

Happy Friday the 13th! It’s a lucky day for me as I have not one but two finishes to report. Minutes ago I finished sewing the label on Toile Story:

2015-2 Toile Story label

Over the last few days I hand stitched 343″ of binding. My stitches are about three to the inch, meaning I took somewhere in the neighborhood of 1,000 stitches to finish the binding. And I enjoyed every one.

Toile Story measures 76″ x 91″. I may have to take it somewhere outside my home to get flat pictures of the front and back. Look for photos in a future post.

My second finish is this quilt top, which now measures 56½” square:

2015-2 Cutting Corners w borders

Adding plain borders to float the blocks was a good call. There was one thing I had to do before I could call the top done, though. I was bothered by something in the upper right block.

In this photo look at the upper left corner of the floral square:

2015-2 block before QC

See that little white spot? It’s part of the floral design but to me it looked like a hole in the fabric. Quilter’s caulk to the rescue:

2015-2 QC

One of my quilt teachers told me about quilter’s caulk, otherwise known as Sharpie Ultra Fine Point permanent marking pens. You can’t use colored ink to fill a gap or seam, which is the definition of the verb “to caulk,” but you can use it to color correct a seam or some other part of an item made with fabric.

With just a touch of my aqua Ultra-Fine Point Sharpie I made that hole disappear:

2015-2 block after QC

To see how I’ve used Quilter’s Caulk on other projects, check out this previous post from 2012.

Tomorrow is Valentine’s Day. I hope you are doing something special with a loved one. My valentine is taking me to dinner at the historic Multnomah Falls Lodge in the Columbia Gorge. Lucky me!

 

 

 

Posted in quilter's caulk, update | 5 Comments

Star Steps

Step 1. Make an 18½” star block. Why? Oh, just for fun. And to use up focus fabric left over from another project.

2015-1 Long Pointed Star 800


Step 2
. Put a ring around it. Now it measures 24½”.

Seeing Stars block


Step 3
. Make three more blocks and put all four up on the design wall:

Billie's Star


Step 4
. Decide that it needs “something in the middle” to draw attention to the secondary star formed when the blocks are put together.

That’s where I was when last I posted about this project. Here’s where I am now:

Billie's Star 1
Isn’t that a fun addition? Using triangles instead of squares, I made a 4-Patch Wonder block (my term for four fabric repeats layered, cut, and rotated to form a symmetrical design) and then added ¼”and ⅜”-wide sashing strips.

Here’s a close-up of that little faux-kaleidoscope block. With the sashing strips it measures 4″ square:

Billie's Star center
So what’s Step 5? Borders! I want to float those blocks so I’ll add border strips in the same blue background fabric. When I’m done my quilt top will measure 56½” square. Then it’s on to Step 6: piecing a backing.

And I vow not to start something else “just for fun” until I’ve finished the three quilts that got moved to the back burner when I started Seeing Stars.

 

 

 

Posted in 4-Patch Wonder, faux-kaleido quilts, update | 6 Comments

Design Dilemma

Earlier this week my twin sister Diane called me with a home dec design dilemma. The small chest that sat between two red leather chairs in her living room was so narrow that people sitting in the chairs couldn’t see each other around the lamp at the back of the chest. Her solution was a clever one: she claimed a matching chest from another room and placed it back to back with the first one. Then she had a piece of glass made to fit the top. The only problem was that you could see under the glass where the two chests met in the middle.

Could she commission me to make a table runner to cover the middle section? Of course she could. She wanted something very simple — no piecing required, just a rectangle about 9″ wide and long enough to extend down both sides of the chest. We talked about colors to match her living room — deep red, tan, forest green. I was ready to charge off to a fabric store to look at home dec fabrics.

Diane was incredulous. “Don’t you have some fabric in your stash that will work?” she asked. Well, of course I did. A little stash diving resulted in this group of fabrics sent from Portland to Atlanta via iPhone for Diane’s inspection:

fabric choices

She liked the print in the center of the photo — the one with the red flowers and vines on a tan background — and the red and tan toile on the right side. No need to choose between them. By making the table runner reversible, we could use both fabrics.

I pulled a red leaf print from my stash for the binding:

the winning combo
The only thing I needed to buy was topstitching thread. It had to be just the right color to look good on both fabrics, as the backgrounds are similar but definitely not the same. In no time at all my quilt sandwich was ready. I decided to quilt a diagonal 1″ grid across the surface of the table runner, using my walking foot and this light taupe rayon thread by Madeira that has a beautiful sheen:

topstitching thread
I cut the binding strips on the bias, by the way, because I knew the leaf print would look better that way. Here is the runner quilted and ready to bind:

ready to bind
Notice that the table runner isn’t just a rectangle? It wouldn’t be much more work, I reasoned, to make the ends pointed, and it would be so much more elegant. It didn’t occur to me until later that I would have six corners to miter and that four of those corners would be angles greater than 90 degrees. No worries, though. Heather Peterson of Anka’s Treasures has an excellent tutorial on her blog, Trends and Traditions, that shows how to bind outside corners greater than 90 degrees.

Once the binding was stitched on, I tacked it down on the other side using Steam-a-Seam 2, a double stick fusible webbing. At the top of the photo you can see how the webbing is positioned right along the folded edge of the binding:

fusing the binding

(Steam-a-Seam 2 comes in ¼”-wide rolls. All I had on hand was ½”-wide. Easy enough to cut it in half to make ¼”-wide strips.) The fusible webbing made short work of finishing the binding. All that was left was tacking down the mitered corners by hand. I was on the last miter when I noticed I had missed three rows of quilting:

tacking down the binding (2)
Now doesn’t this look better?

stitching corrected
Here is Diane’s reversible table runner (measuring 9-3/8″ x 41″), ready to be boxed and mailed:

runner completed

This little project was a pleasant diversion from binding Toile Story. I do enjoy binding quilts by hand but was ready for a little break. Diane said she wasn’t in a hurry to receive this but was hoping to get it before she hosts a cocktail party later this month. She’ll be very surprised to get this in the mail so soon — unless she sees this post first.

 

 

 

Posted in family, home dec, mitered corners, update | 3 Comments

Toile Story

You’ve heard of a tall story, haven’t you?

Well, today I have a Toile Story for you. That’s the name I’ve given my checkerboard square quilt, just back from the quilter. Here it is hanging from the arbor on my back deck, in one of the few shots I was able to get today when the breeze died down:

2015-2, Toile Story

(Those tablecloth weights hanging along the bottom of the quilt helped a tiny bit with the breeze. Also helping was the Dear Husband, who was behind the quilt trying to keep it from billowing backward.) Toile Story measures 73″ x 89″ after quilting and trimming.

You may remember from an earlier post that the pattern Checkerboard Square was designed by Alex Anderson using her Never Enough Romance line for P&B Fabrics. I bought the fabric (and cut the quilt out) in 2008 but more than five years passed before I put it together. I finished piecing the back on the last day of 2014.

Toile Story was beautifully quilted by Debbie Scroggy of All Quilted, LLC. Let me show you some details of Debbie’s fine work. Notice that every single seam was stitched in the ditch and the rail fence blocks were all quilted ¼” from the seams. The toile centers of each block were quilted with a feathered wreath design:

feathered wreath in centers
The circles quilted in the royal blue inner border echo the centers of the feathered wreaths in the toile blocks as well as the design printed on the border fabric itself:

circles

corner feather

Debbie and I planned that. The photo above also shows the feather motif quilted in the corner triangles. The side triangles have feathers as well:

side triangle feathers
For the outer border I asked Debbie to quilt “something viny, with leaves.” The motif she chose echoes the round shapes quilted in the interior of the quilt and remains secondary, as I wanted it to be, to the strong lines of the toile fabric design. It’s easier to see the vines and leaves on the back:

details on back

The back of Toile Story features an oversized Goose in the Pond block, deliberately situated above and to the left of center:

back of Toile Story
Before I can legitimately claim Toile Story as a 2015 finish, I have to bind it and label it. I’m ready to get started . . .

ready for binding. . . and that’s no tall story.

 

 

 

Posted in update | 13 Comments

Stars x 4

A few days ago I gave in to the temptation to play around with a large star block using some fabric leftover from another project. Now I have four blocks, each measuring 24½”:

Billie's Star

I’ll bet you think I’m ready to sew these blocks together. Not so fast! See how the blue fabric in the center forms a secondary star? I think something needs to go in the center of that block. And I have an idea what it needs to be.

I hope you’ll come back for a visit to see what I did. In the meantime, have a splendid weekend.

 

 

 

Posted in update | 1 Comment

Still Seeing Stars

The star block I started playing with last week has expanded, now measuring 24½”:

Seeing Stars block
I cut enough fabric to make three more blocks and fashioned a plastic template to help me line up the points on the ring around the star:

star blocks in process

What’s going on here? I have no idea. We’ll just have to see where it takes me.

 

 

 

Posted in update | 4 Comments